Football: What an Absolute Came-farce!

Sport is full of success, disappointment, victory and togetherness, but none of that was shown by the Cameroon team on their way out of the Women’s FIFA World Cup. Even after the final whistle, their ridiculous antics were carried into the press conference by head coach Alain Djeumfa.

Key Events: (Minute of game)

  • Yvonne Leuko clearly slaps Nikita Parris on the face, but only shown a yellow card.  (4′)
  • Augustine Ejangue clearly passes the ball back to the keeper, who picks it up, resulting in an indirect free-kick. (12′)
  • The following two minutes see the Cameroon players argue about the decision, and England player Toni Duggan is spat at by Ejangue. Eventually Steph Houghton scores for England from the indirect free-kick. (14′)
  • Just as half-time approaches England’s Ellen White scores a goal, which is disallowed for offside. Once checked via VAR, the goal is given. (45′)
  • Cameroon players refuse to continue as they believe they have been cheated, and the situation isn’t being helped by their coach. (45′)
  • Cameroon start the second-half well and score immediately. The goal is rightly chalked-off for offside, after viewing it on VAR. (49′)
  • The Cameroon players are devastated, and Ajara Nchout (the scorer of the goal) needs consoling by both her teammates and coach after being in tears. (49′)
  • Alex Greenwood scores after a well worked corner kick. (58′)
  • Penalty not given to England after a VAR check. (78′)
  • After a late and dangerous tackle, Alexandra Takounda is given a yellow card after a VAR check. (90’+9′)

Have a look at the amazing behaviour for yourself;

Were Cameroon right to be upset?

Absolutely no!

Leuko, Ejangue and Takounda should all have been sent off.

The England goal that was given, and the disallowed Cameroon goal were both correct decisions.

England should have been given a penalty.

Worst of all, after the game the Cameroon coach Alain Djeumfa came out and talked about the injustice that his team was subjected to, adding that he was proud of the passion his team showed in defeat.

What a load of rubbish!

Mr. Djeumfa clearly needs to get back to doing his coaching badges, and maybe start with the rules of the game as he doesn’t know them. I can understand the showing of blind support for your team, but when all the dust settles, I hope the Cameroon team as a whole, feel embarrassed by their behaviour and get fined accordingly for effectively sulking like a bunch of toddlers.

What about England?

A magnificent display by the Lionesses. The way they handled themselves throughout the game and during the press conferences were exemplary.

The only positive to be taken from a game that, for the lack of a better word, was a complete farce. So much so that former USA goalkeeper, Hope Solo, was trying to make excuses for the Cameroon team in what could only be described as a salvage act.

Unfortunately for England coach, Phil Neville, his team now have a nervous wait to see if Steph Houghton will recover from the brutal tackle against Cameroon in time to face Norway in the quarter-finals.

For Cameroon, it should back to the rule book. Hopefully they get through the whole thing without calling it quits.

 

 

Football: FIFA Women’s World Cup

All I keep hearing is how the men are “much better than the women.”

How the women “wouldn’t be able to compete with the men.”

If you are one of the people who keep doing this, then please take this moment to realise that you are simply an idiot.

You know who you are…

You see, all of the factors that make men “better” than women are simply based on genetics and nothing else.

The male body is designed to be faster and stronger than a woman’s. As football is a physical sport, these two major advantages are more than enough in helping males be “better” than females. 

I simply cannot believe I am having to explain this…Sigh!

So, let’s take genetics out of this, and have a look at the entire game solely based on ability and knowledge. 

Both men and women:

  • Understand the game equally well. 
  • Train equally hard.
  • Play the same amount of time.
  • Use the same size pitches and goals.
  • Follow the same rules.

The only aspect in which men trump women is in decision making as they are more clinical in and around the opposition box. 

However, women are more honest and don’t dive around as much. This aspect alone makes the game more entertaining as there’s no time wasting or “professionalism” as it’s referred to. 

No mate, it’s just plain cheating. 

Let’s call a spade, a spade.

If anything the women’s game has less stoppages simply because the players just get on with it.

Then there’s the people referring to USA’s thumping victory against Thailand as something that would never happen in the men’s game.

Actually, that’s not entirely true…

Yes, the 13-0 win for USA is a record victory in the Women’s World Cup, but that’s not too different to the 10-1 win for Hungary against El Salvador in the 1982 Men’s World Cup finals. What’s interesting is that the largest margin of victory during World Cup qualifying for the two sexes were the 21-0 victories attained by 4 different nations in the women’s game (Australia, Japan, New Zealand and Canada) all in the late 90’s, which is a colossal 10 goals fewer than what the Australian men notched up when they beat American Samoa 31-0, in 2001.

So don’t tell me it doesn’t happen in the men’s game.

Is the Women’s World Cup worth watching?

Honestly, it’s been great so far.

As the group stages have come to a close, it’s clear that the women’s game has come a long way in the last four years alone. The physical nature of the players, their fitness levels and aggression is excellent. And these ladies can play.

The games between Australia and Brazil (3-2) and Germany against Spain (1-0) have been two of my favourites. Pure end to end football with no let-up by any team.

Now, I have to admit that I used to tune into the Women’s World Cup for the same reason I used to watch the African Cup of Nations (The major men’s continental tournament played amongst the African countries), the goalkeeping was shambolic.

Any Ideas who these goalkeepers are? (Via WikiCommons)

This time round though, I have been incredibly impressed with the goalkeepers. The Chilean keeper, Christiane Endler, has been unbelievable. Some of the saves she pulled off against the Americans were good enough to rival any male counterpart.

Moral of the article…

Stop being an idiot.

Instead of trying to come up with a reason to ridicule something, enjoy it for what it is. A good-old-fashioned game of football, played at a high level, by people who are proudly representing their nations for the entertainment of millions.

After all, football is a game for everyone, and that’s why we love it!

Manfriend’s Mumblings | Sports Chat: The Champions League 2018

[Hey everyone! Manfriend, here. So, I’m sure people have been worried about my absence, but I decided to take a short break off from blogging after this summer’s awesome World Cup. I wasn’t really sure when to start back up again, but then I got a request from my partner about writing something for the Champions League, so here I am! Let’s get to it.]

The Champions League.

In 1955, what was originally named the European Cup was established. In 1992, the tournament changed its name to Champions League. Today (and in all the years of its history), this tournament is one that excites most football fans around the globe. It is Europe’s No. 1 club competition, and it gives every football club on the continent a “chance” to lift the trophy. Whether you are from one of the big footballing nations, such as, England, Spain, Italy or Germany, or from minnows like Luxembourg or Andorra, as long as you have a recognized domestic league, your clubs have an opportunity to be victorious.

Well, kind of.

Let me explain this thing.

First, how to qualify:

This takes care of itself, really. Every recognized European nation, apart from Liechtenstein (who don’t have a domestic league) will be assigned places in the two European competitions, the other being Europa League, Europe’s second-tier club competition. The allocations are based on the performances of that nation’s domestic clubs over the last five seasons. So, the better your teams perform in Europe, the better your ranking is as a nation, which leads to more spots in the larger competitions. As a result, England and Spain are given four spots apiece, whereas San Marino only get one.

Those allocated spots are filled by clubs who win their domestic leagues or finish in the top four. This all also depends on how many places you have been allocated. For example, the top four teams from England qualify, whereas only the champion from San Marino gets a spot.

On its surface, it may seem unfair. However, it may also be OK. Ultimately, though, the chances are that you will never see that team from San Marino compete, as they have to enter in at the qualification rounds. Think of it as a “getting rid of the trash” round. A nation with one qualifier will need that team to play three to five home and away matches in order to get to the competition proper, while three-quarters of the teams from England qualify automatically for the group stage, with the fourth team having to play just one home and one away tie to make it.

Alas, that’s just how it goes.

(Still don’t get it? Here’s my friend, Wikipedia, to help explain.)

Anyway, once you get to the group stage, that’s when the competition really sets in. Groups are decided with a random draw based on seedings. Once assigned, things kick off!

Eight groups of four teams play in a league format. Each team plays the other three teams both at home and away. The points system is as follows: 0 for a loss, 1 for a draw and 3 for a win. The games are played on a weekly or fortnightly (that’s every two weeks for friends in America) basis, with the top two teams advancing to the knockout stages. The third team drops down to play in the knockout phases of the Europa League. The fourth team is eliminated.

Then there’s a winter break from December to February.

Once we reach the knockout phase, all eight teams who finished first will play the eight teams that finished second, in accordance with another random draw. The games take place at home and away, with the advancing team being decided on by an aggregate score. Winners go into the quarters. The draw repeats, and things go on until there are two left for the final. This year, that match will take place in Madrid.

champsleague1
Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid, where this season’s final will be held. (WikiCommons)

I realize the Champions League may sound no different to any other football tournament, and that’s partly true. But once again, the drama, talent and unpredictability makes this a great spectacle. The past has seen teams like Nottingham Forest, Aston Villa, Celtic, Red Star Belgrade, Feyenoord and Steaua Bucharest achieve greatness. Unfortunately, these teams will be very unlikely to repeat such triumphs again, as money has taken over. That doesn’t mean, though, that predicting the winner is easy. It’s predicting the country of origin that’s not so difficult. The last time a team from outside the top four nations (England, Spain, Italy, Germany) won was in 2003/04: Porto of Portugal.

Since then, the top four nations have monopolized victory:

  • England took home three, with Chelsea, Manchester United and Liverpool;
  • Spain nabbed eight, with Barcelona and Real Madrid each winning four times;
  • Italy took two, with AC Milan and Inter Milan;
  • Germany won one with Bayern Munich.

The last time a club outside one of those four countries even reached the final was in 2003/04, when Monaco lost to Porto. This year, the only chance of it happening will be if PSG (Paris Saint Germain) make it (which wouldn’t shock anyone, as they are filthy rich). Money has completely eradicated the “fairytale ending,” yet, as always, I’m excited.

Why?

Just look at the teams that are involved: Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool, Real Madrid, Barcelona, Juventus, Bayern Munich, and the list goes on.

More importantly, my team, Galatasaray from Turkey, are involved again, following some tumultuous years for the club.

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Galatasaray fans in London, cheering the team on in a 2004 match against Chelsea. (WikiCommons)

(Much to my partner’s chagrin,) I will be up at 3 a.m. with my club’s colors on, willing the boys on to victory through the screen of my iPad. I hope you will join me and my team from wherever you are, ideally all the way through the knockout phases (but more likely to the end of the group phase.)

The Champions League is exciting, with a caliber of football skill on show that’s no less fantastic than that of the World Cup. Matches can be full of drama. If that isn’t enough to hook you, then maybe you should listen to the best intro music of any sporting event!

I mean honestly, how could anyone not be a fan of the Champions League?


As of this article’s publishing (Sept. 18, 2018), the Champions League is set to begin. Find information on the tournament here. And from our little home in Beijing: Go Galatasaray!